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What is 'cosmetic' grade glitter?

Posted on June 22 2015

What is 'cosmetic' grade glitter?
and what makes it different from regular craft glitter? It is important when buying cosmetic glitter products that the glitter included is high quality cosmetic grade glitter.  Especially when the glitter is to be applied around the eyes. The reasons? Well, the main reason is that what it is made of.  Craft glitter is made of metal (yikes! ) and cosmetic glitter is made from plastic, usually some form of polyester. Some companies will sell ( cheaper to source ) metal craft glitter and try to pass them off as a cosmetic glitter.  It is important that you find a reputable cosmetics company as all it takes is one tiny little particle of that metal to fall into your eye and you run the risk of serious cornea scratches or abrasions. Cosmetic glitter is also more finely milled and usually cut into a circular shape, helping reduce the risk of scratching.  Craft glitters are usually cut at angles, such as hexagons or squares. Also, most craft glitters are still poly coated dyes which can leach out when they come in contact with moisture from your eye or mixing mediums.  Whereas the pigment used in cosmetic grade glitters are non toxic. There are also cosmetic standards to packing cosmetic glitters as defined by GMP (good manufacturing procedures) which helps insure that the workers packing the product are following proper sanitary conduct, there is no risk of rust from machinery that could possibly get into the glitter, etc. A great source of glitter info is this article by xovain, she explains some of the safety issues surrounding glitter use on the face and body

"Mostly. Personally, I've been dousing myself in glitter since I was a teenager, and I've never had a single glitter-related injury.

That said, nothing in the world is 100% safe to put near your eyes. Glitter has the potential to irritate your peepers and scratch up your corneas, which is VERY painful--but eyes are delicate, and even a contact lens or a rogue eyelash can do the same thing. By using cosmetic-grade glitter you are significantly reducing this risk, but you can’t eliminate it altogether.

Worn on the skin, glitter is pretty safe. Wash your hands well after applying, and don’t commit any crimes while wearing it--glitter is so unique that it’s considered awesome forensic evidence."

Cosmetic glitter won’t hurt you unless you eat a LOT of it, which you shouldn’t do. You should also be careful not to inhale it. And please don’t take those pills that promise to make your poop sparkle. That’s so gross."

She also mentions about picking good products...this is where we come in!

"Glitter should always be suspended in something--in a gel, on an adhesive, in a gloss, etc. Applying loose glitter directly to your person is a bad idea, as it won’t stick properly and you run the risk of inhaling it or transferring it elsewhere (i.e., into your eyes). So picking good products are very important!"

Here at GlitterEyes we include a water based fixative gel in our kits that you use to fix the glitter onto the skin.  We recommend mixing the glitter with the gel first on the back of your hand and then applying.  We have found this to be the best method while avoiding the dreaded glitter fallout!

When buying your glitter from us you be assured that you will be using high quality cosmetic grade glitter made here in the UK by our superb glitter suppliers that come manufactured to EU standards.

  So that's the science bit!  We hope that you have enjoyed this little glimpse into the safety aspects of glitter. While glitter is a really fun product to use and market we also have to be mindful of the health and safety aspects of our business, this is why our customers well-being was at the forefront at all times when the product was in development. Have a great evening sparklers and see you tomorrow for more glitter gossip!   Carrie xx  

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